ISSUE 23, October 2007

Editorial
Quarterly Communication: Speech of the Pro Grand Master : Quarterly Communication
Grand Secretary: Exciting times ahead
Historic: Telford - Mason extraordinary
Travel: Cruising round Sicily
Samaritan: Helping the distressed
Younger Masons: The common bond
Jersey: Local Masons guard the Duke
   Classic car run: Down memory lane
International: Joseph Brant - a Masonic legend
Universities Scheme: The way ahead
Grand Chancellor: The importance of external relations
Education: Events : Understanding the symbols of the craft
Specialist Lodges: Australia link
Royal Arch: Why join the Royal Arch?
Lbrary & Museum: Major award for Library & Museum
MQ Signs off
Masonic Charities: Grand Charity : NMSF : RMBI : RMTGB
Letters, Book reviews, Gardening

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Examples of historical jewels, regalia and photographs in the Library and Museum collections

Top
Jewel designed by Alphonse Mucha for the Grand Lodge of Czechoslovakia c 1930

Above
Paper apron used during the siege of Ladysmith – one of many conflict related items in the collections

Below
The Duke of Connaught in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)
    As part of the application process, the Library and Museum submitted statements from expert users of the collections. These included James Stevens Curl, the author of the prizewinning and pioneering book The Art and Architecture of Freemasonry, who said that the collections “should be consulted by any serious scholar working in the field of national, European and American cultural history”.
     Jessica Harland-Jacobs, from the University of Florida, used the archive and photo collections extensively for her new book Builders of Empire: Freemasons and British imperialism 1717-1927, and described the Library and Museum as “a national treasure”.
     The field of music, musicians and Freemasonry has seen much new research recently. Professor Simon McVeigh from Goldsmiths College led the way, looking at Freemasons’ Hall as a major London concert venue.
     Another researcher in this field, Andrew Pink, described the value of the collection as being “the complete picture it presents of the musical culture of the ordinary eighteenth century man in the street”. The Library and Museum has recently completed cataloguing its sheet music collection.
     For Anthony du Boulay who, amongst his many other qualifications, is adviser on ceramics to the National Trust, the ceramics are “by far the most important and comprehensive collection” of Chinese export porcelain decorated with Masonic symbols.
     The collection of Masonic figures and groups from the Meissen factory bears comparison with the many examples he had studied in the National Trust collections.
     Dr Nicholas Saunders, Reader in Material Culture at University College, London has worked with the collections in his own specialisation of studying conflict-related objects, describes the collections as “unique” and “opening a door to several different kinds of academic investigation”.
     No wonder the Library and Museum team are proud to display their certificate!





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